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Wicked - Season Option

The untold musical story of the Wicked Witch of the West and Glinda the Good.

Wicked Star Christine Dwyer on ‘Soaking It All In’ as Elphaba on Tour

The leading role of Elphaba in Wicked gives any actress who tackles the part a lot to sink her teeth into. Currently donning the green makeup in the national tour, which is currently playing Orlando's Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre through March 10, Christine Dwyer is “enjoying every moment” as the misunderstood heroine. The actress recently talked with Broadway.com about going green, singing the show’s challenging songs and more.

“There are so many colors to Elphaba—no pun intended,” Dwyer said, alluding to the extensive makeup required for the part. “I find new things with each performance. I'm very lucky to be able to play a role like this so early in my career. I likely will never play one this large again, so I am soaking it all in.”

In the show, Elphaba demonstrates intense passion and wit, which are qualities Dwyer said she relates to. “I am passionate and sometimes that passion tends to come out in outbursts that I can't always control,” she said. “I am sarcastic and always try to find the humor in tough situations, which I think Elphaba does a lot.”

Another thing that Elphaba does a lot in Wicked is belt. Stephen Schwartz’s demanding score gives any actress who can hack it many moments to shine and Dwyer is up to the task. “’No Good Deed’ is one of my favorites to sing because it is such a release,” Dwyer said of the emotional Act II number. “At that point, Elphaba has been through just about all she can handle, and as a performer, so have I!”

Dwyer is joined onstage by Jeanna de Waal as Glinda, Billy Harrigan Tighe as Fiyero, Paul Kreppel as the Wizard and Marilyn Caskey as Madame Morrible. The musical is a reimagining version of The Wizard of Oz that spotlights the untold stories of Oz’s most famous characters: the Wicked Witch of the West and her unlikely friend, Glinda the Good.

“Don't judge people for their differences,” Dwyer said of the show’s message. “Just because you don't understand someone else's lifestyle or the way they look doesn't mean you have the right to govern them. And you never know, that person could end up being your best friend.”

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